William Ballard

Male Abt 1603 - 1639


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  • Name  William Ballard  [1
    Born  Abt 1603  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  Between 13 Mar 1639 and 06 Jun 1639  Lynn, Essex Co, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Notes 
    • Passenger list dated 13 July, 1635. "Theis under written names are to be transported to N. England imbarqued in the James, Jnd May Mr for N: E: p'r Cert: from the minister of their conformity in Religion and that they are no Subsedy men.
      Wm Ballard husb: 32
      Elizabeth Ballard 26
      Hester Ballard 2
      Jo: Ballard 1
      !NEHGR 14:321

      William, husbandman, and Esther Ballard, of Lynn came to America on the ship "JAMES" in 1635.
      !A JENKS GENEALOGY; Helen Clark Jenks Cleary

      "JAMES" of Bristol, sailed June 4, 1635, arrived August 17, having 100 passengers, honest people of Yorkshire, being put into the Isle of Shoals, lost three anchors; and setting sail, no canvas nor ropes would hold, but she was driven within a cable's length of the rocks at Pascataquack, when suddenly the wind, coming to the N.W., put then back to the Isle of Shoals, and being there ready to strike upon the rocks, they let out a piece of their mainsail, and weathered the rocks. Only 21 passengers were named.
      !Planters Of The Commonwealth, 1930 by Charles E. Banks

      The BALLARDS sailed from Bristol, on the "James", as did the "Angel Gabriel". Both ships were anchored near the main coast on 15 August, when they were hit by a terrible storm. The "James" barely escaped being driven onto the rocks on the Isle of Shoals but the "Angel Gabriel" was not so fortunate and it broke up on the rocks of the island. The following is excerpts from the journal of the Rev. Richard MATHER on the ship "JAMES" in 1635:

      June 22 - Five ships sailed from Bristol, three bound for Newfoundland; the 150 ton "Diligence", the 80 ton "Mary" and the "Bess" (or Elizabeth) and two bound for New England; the 240 ton "Angel Gabriel" and the 220 ton "James".
      June 23 - In the evening they lost sight of the three ships bound for Newfoundland, but the master of the "James" thought it best to stay with the "Angel Gabriel" bound for New England, rather than leave her and go to the ships bound for Newfoundland. The "Angel Gabriel" was a strong ship, well armed with fourteen or sixteen cannons, and the crew desired her company. However, she was slow and sometimes the "James" went with three sails less than she could have used.
      June 29 - In the afternoon captain Taylor went aboard the "Angel Gabriel" and he took Matthew Mitchell and Rev. Richard Mather with him. They found much sickness aboard and two cases of small pox, but the latter were recovered. They had supper with the ship's master and had good cheese, boiled mutton, roasted turkey and good sack.
      July 14 - The sea was rough, many were seasick and no one could go up on deck because of the tossing and tumbling of the ship. They lost sight of the "Angel Gabriel" sailing slowly behind them and they never saw her again.
      August 14 - At ten o'clock at night they dropped anchor at the Isle of Shoales and there "slept sweetly the night until daybreak."
      August 15 - They were hit by a terrible storm, with rain and easterly wind. In the morning they lost three great anchors and cables. The third cable was cut to save the ship. "We had no outward means of deliverance but by loosing sail, if so be we might get to the sea from amongst the islands and rocks where we anchored." Their sails were split in pieces as if they were rags. At one point they thought they would be blown onto the rocks and thought only God could save them. Suddenly a new fresh gale appeared and they continued southwest by west toward Cape Anne. "When news was brought to us in the gun room that the danger was past, oh how our hearts did then relent and melt within us! And how we burst into tears of joy amongst ourselves, in love onto our gracious God, and admiration of his kindness in granting to his poor servants such an extraordinary and miraculous deliverance. His holy name be blessed forever."
      August 16 - "This day we went directly before the wind, and had delight all along the coast as we went, in viewing Cape Ann, the bay of Saugust, the bay of Salem, Marblehead and other places and came to anchor at low tide at Nantasket, in a most pleasant harbor, like to such I had never seen, amongst a great many lands on every side. After the evening exercise, when it was flowing tide again, we set sail and came the night to anchor again before Boston and so rested that night with glad and thankful hearts that God had put an end to our long journey, being 1,000 leagues, that is 3,000 English miles, over one of the greatest seas of the world. First of all it was very safe and healthful to us, for we were in a ship with 100 passengers, besides 23 seamen, 23 cows and heifers, 3 suckling calves and 8 mares, yet not one of these died by the way, neither person nor cattell, but came all alive to land, and many of the cattell in better condition than when they first entered the ship. We had a comfortable variety of food, seeing we were not tied to the ship's diet, but did victual ourselves, we had no want of good and wholesome beer and bread, and as our land stomachs grew weary of ship diet of salt fish and salt beef and the like, we had liberty to change for other food which might sort better with our health and stomachs and therefore sometimes we used bacon and buttered peas, sometimes buttered bag-pudding made curraynes and raisins, and sometimes drink pottage of beer and oatmeal and sometimes water pottage well buttered." When they reached land they learned that the last storm they survived uprooted many trees on shore and a bark sailing from the bay to Marblehead was cast away. Of the 23 aboard all were lost except a man and his wife who were spared to report the news. The "Angel Gabriel", at anchor at Pemmaquid, was burst in pieces and cast away in the storm. Most of the cattell and other good perished and one seaman and 3 or 4 passengers perished. "But the 'James' and we that were therein, with our cattell and goods, were all preserved alive. The Lord's name be blessed forever." The actual crossing took six weeks and five days. They were aboard the ship a total of 12 weeks and 2 days, for they lay anchor and manuevered around England many weeks before setting across the ocean.
      !Search For The Passengers Of The Mary & John - 20:67

      William BALLARD of Lynn failed to make a will, but told Nicholas BROWNE and Gerard SPENCER, Jr., that he wished half his estate to go to his wife, the rest divided amongst his children. [Test. 1 - 1639]
      !Pope, p.30
    Person ID  I18578  Bryant
    Last Modified  24 Aug 2008 

    Family  Elizabeth Lee,   b. Abt 1609, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1681 
    Married  Abt 1633  England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Children 
     1. Esther Ballard,   b. Abt 1633, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1717, Pawtucket, Providence Co, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. John (Jonathan?) Ballard,   b. 1634, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 1725, Lynn, Essex Co, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Nathaniel Ballard,   b. 1636, Lynn, Essex Co, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1722, Lynn, Essex Co, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F567  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1603 - England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1633 - England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Between 13 Mar 1639 and 06 Jun 1639 - Lynn, Essex Co, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S221] Browne, Jenks Family, Browne, William B., (Author, Concord, New Hampshire, 1952).

    2. [S220] Pope, Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry, (Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, MD, (1905) 1965), p.30.

    3. [S312] The Great Migration, Anderson, Robert Charles & George F. Sanborn, Melinde Lutz Sanborn, (New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, 1999), p. 108.

    4. [S312] The Great Migration, Anderson, Robert Charles & George F. Sanborn, Melinde Lutz Sanborn, (New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, 1999), p. 148.


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