Bartylmew Partrydge

Male 1545 - 1598


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  • Name  Bartylmew Partrydge 
    Born  1545  Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  1598  Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Abstract of the will of Bartholomew Partridge of Navestock, Essex, Yeoman.
      "my body to be buried in the little chancell in Navestock where my great-grandfather lyeth
      "to the poore people of the parish of Navesstock 30 shillings
      "to my eldest son John Partridge my house wherein I now dwell called Mardeynes with lands and four adjoining tenements (another called Clement Meade; another called Coppie Landes, being coppiehold lying in Navestock; another tenement copyhold in Hutton)
      "to my second son Bartholomew Partridge (who is under 21): lands bought of Richard Greene and Robert Greene sons to Nicholas Greene
      "to my youngest son Gabrell (Gabryell, Gabraell) (under 21): lands in Navestock and High Ongar
      "to my daughter Katherine: L100 at the day of her marriage or 1 year after my decease
      "to daughter Marie (Marye): L100 at age 21 or on the day of her marriage
      "to my brother William Partridge's children: Johanne (my god-daughter), Margerie, Gabreyell
      "my lovong brothers in law Richard, Thomaas, Reynold and Robert Greene
      Witnesses Thomas Camp, John Benton, Thomas Perry

      Written 27 Oct 1597 Proved 20 Oct 1598 in the Court of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's Cathedral FHL#94260
    Notes 
    • Address Delivered by William H. Partridge, of Newton, Mass., At Templeton, Mass., Wednesday, August 16, 1893
      (Extracted in Part)

      Seventy miles west of London, sixteen miles south-east of Gloucester, in the County of Gloucestershire, England, on the banks of the river Churn, lies the town of Cirencester. It was founded by the ancient Britons, and when Rome mastered the world she surrounded the locality with massive walls, the ruins of which are still traceable for miles.
      In 1066 William the Conqueror, of Normandy, by reason of his conquests, ascended the English throne and soon after incorporated the ancient little French Providence of Normandy, the land of his birth, into his new kingdom. This made the crossing of the narrow English channel easy to this maritime and adventurous people. To England they came in considerable numbers and the interchange of the Norman and British blood has made the English nation what she is today.
      Among these bold adventurers came Richard de Pertriche, or his ancestors, the valor of whom secured royal recognition. Duly registered and undisputably recorded is the head of the family, Richard de Pertriche, this being the original and correct form of the name, A.D. 1254, the family receiving from time to time from the Crown certain grants of land in the County Gloucestershire, among which was this known as the Wishanger seat of the Partridge Family, bordering on the County of Wilts.
      "The Hamlet of Wishanger is situated about one mile north-west of Miserden. Osculf Musard, of Musarden (as it was formerly spelled), gave Wishanger (then called Riscanger) now pronounced Wessinger, as a foundation for an establishment of Knight Templars, from whom it was passed to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, who held it till their dissolution. It was afterwards granted to Sir Thomas Palmer in the 6th year of Edward the VI. He was attainted of high treason in trying to seat Lady Jane Gray upon the throne, and executed, and his estates confiscated.
      In the first year of queen Mary the estate of Wishanger was granted to William Lord Howard. Christopher Bumstead, for some reason, levied a fine upon the manor, and in the 4th year of Mary this estate came for the first time into the hands of the Partridge family, who had been for a long time possessors of several other large estates in this county, dating from Henry Second's time soon after the year 1154."
      It was always an important family. These royal grants prove it. It was then also an ancient family and one of the landed gentry. The most noted English genealogists always speak of it "as large settled as Wishanger Manor, in the Parish of Miserden."
      Its Norman origin also attests to the family's great antiquity, for the chief of the family, who is described as "Partridge the Norman," migrated during the wars between Stephen and Empress Maud to England. For his military services King Henry II granted to him land in Essex, though the family afterwards settled in Gloucestershire. The Manor house is very old and picturesque, as the interesting photographs in my possession of this ancient home of the Partridge's and its surroundings readily attest.
      This Manor house was rebuilt, and the present porch added in 1578, forty-two years before our Pilgrim Fathers first set foot on these cold New England shores, by Robert de Petriche, who married Anne, daughter of John Ernie of Cannings, Wiltshire. The coat of arms of Robert and his wife are impaled in imperishable stone over the door of this porch, while a quaint sun dial, which is mentioned in Burke's Landed Gentry," still higher up holds watch and ward as it has done for centuries. This Manor house is a veritable and valuable relic of the grim past. These walls for centuries have sheltered and comforted the valorous gentry and yeomany of this one of the most ancient and respected families in the English realm, its origin reaching far back to the oldest peerage in the present House of Lords, that being Baron de Roy, A.D. 1802.
      What an opportunity for the imigination! Those halls have rung with many a laugh and resounded with the clanging of valerous Norman warriors and knights, while they have also been silent witnesses for centuries of the routine of pleasures and woes, the inheritance of every family.
      The Miserden Parish records, which date from 1578, contain this quaint entry: "This 10th January was buried Old Jean out of Mr. Partridge's house." From father to son this estate has come for many generations and is a monument of the perpetuity of at least one wise and well ordered family. The coat of arms with its fine motto, "Dum spiro spero," (while there's breath there's hope) one of the most chaste in the kingdom is as follows:


      ARMS- described thus: Chequy Argent and sable on a bead gules, three escallops Or.
      CREST- but of a ducal coronet Or, a horse's head, sable.
      MOTTO-"Dum spiro spero."
      Colors for LIVERY-White and black with red piping and plated buttons.

      In the rectory of Miserden have lived the spiritual fathers who have ministered to the family all down through time. In the little village church we find a monument beautifully carved in the memory of Anthony Partridge and Alice Cartwight, his wife, who died in 1625. It has a carved coat of arms of both families. The present rector (1893) Rev. Robert B. Earee says of it: "I am never tired of admiring it." In the little cemetery without stands a sarcophagus in memory of the family with an impaled coat of arms but the inscriptions are illegible.
      This is the church of our fathers in England. Let us reverence it. I have views of this monument also. I cannot help feeling its great antiquity, that from the teeming loins of this family sprang the other branches of the family known as Horsendon House in Herefordshire, and the Hockham Hall, near Thetford, in the County of Norfolk and the Bishops Woods' Branch in County of Gloucestershire, for Atkyns speaks of this last family "as longe settled at Wishanger." They are all ancient and honorable families and their estates located within a radius of seventy-five miles of each other. To be descendants of either is an honor "for they were all, all honorable men."
      But we must not longer linger in the land of song and story. Suffice it to say the intolerance of the 17th century led to a generous migration to New England of some of the best of English blood. Among that adventurous and gifted host came several of the Partridge name.....
    Person ID  I12984  Bryant
    Last Modified  18 Feb 2001 

    Family  Pernell Greene,   b. Abt 1545, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1597, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  21 Jan 1567  Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • ||St. Thomas Church||
    Children 
     1. Thomas Partrydge
     2. Elizabeth Partrydge
     3. John Partrydge,   b. Bef 1573, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1573, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Parnell Partrydge,   b. 1576, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. Katherine Partrydge,   b. 1577, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. John Partrydge, Captain,   b. 1578, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1663, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Mary Partrydge,   b. 1581, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Bartholomew Partrydge,   b. 1583
     9. Pernell Partrydge,   b. 1586, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. Gabriell Partrydge,   b. 1590, probably, Navestock, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F771  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1545 - Navestock, Essex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 21 Jan 1567 - Navestock, Essex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1598 - Navestock, Essex, England Link to Google Earth
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