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51 "Caleb Chapman 2d was married to Deborah Jones December the 7th 1738"

Deborah Jones is given by Chapman as dau. of Samuel Jones in error. Daniell Jones is correct. 
Family F1493
 
52 "Caleb Jones of Saybrook & Rachell Clark of farmingtown were married each to other the 23rd day of May 1705" Family F1719
 
53 "Capt. John Kelley, aged 77" Kelley, John (I47754)
 
54 "Capt. Nicholas Peck, Esq." Peck, Nicholas (I44235)
 
55 "Capt. Robt Chapman departed this life the 13th day of October Anno: 1687" Chapman, Robert Capt. (I21977)
 
56 "Catern Chalker born the 8th of September 1657" Chalker, Katherine (I22525)
 
57 "Catharine Gibbs of Windsor" bequeathed to "my eldest son Jacob my dwelling house, barn & orchard, with the land whereon they stand, & all the land adjoining thereunto, which is my proper right by purchase," but if he dies without an heir living to the age of twenty-one then this land to go to "my second son Samuell"; to "my son Benjamin ... my lot on the other side the Great River, the which I purchased of Gregory Gibbs my son-in-law [i.e., stepson]"; her moveables to "my son Jacob ... & to my daughter-in-law his wife," to "my son Benjamin," to "my son Jacob's daughter Mary," and to "my youngest son and executor Benjamin"; the residue to be divided among "my three youngest children," with specific reference to "my son Samuel's part" and "my daughter Sarah's part" [ Hartford PD Case #2148; Manwaring 1:116-18].
The inventory of the estate "left by the widdoe Gibbs Deceased" was taken 21 November 1660 and totalled 220 7s., including real estate valued at 160: "one home lot, seven acres," 30; "one meadow lot, ten acres," 50; "one lot of upland, forty-eight acres," 20; "the dwelling house with barn & land added to the homelot by the said widow's purchase," 30; and "one lot over the great River," 30 [ Hartford PD Case #2148]. 
Carwithyn, Katherine (I29727)
 
58 "Charles L. Stuck came from New York State in the early 1860's to operate a foundry in Hubbardston. (The Stuck and Lusk Foundry had a contract to manufacture parts for the famed Studebaker wagons). After two disastrous fires he abandoned the foundry and established a cabinet shop and buggy business and also Hubbardston's first cider mill. This operation was later carried on by his son, Charles, who was born in Hubbardston, in 1869. Married to the former Minnie Townsend, their two daughters, Flossie De Byle and Lottie Cranson still live in the area, Flossie in Grand Rapids, and Lottie, in Grand Ledge."

The Stuck family moved to Mount Pleasant about June 1899 for a short time. 
Stuck, Charles R. (I5684)
 
59 "Clifton, 1681. Thomas Clifton of Newport aged 75 years went into the water to wash himself and was found Dead swimming in the water naked a few hours after on the 9th. day, 5th month, 1681." Quaker Monthly Meeting - Newport Clifton, Thomas (I50758)
 
60 "Daniel Warren of Watertown Middle Precinct, [died] suddenly at the beginning of the Lords-Day morning exercise Feb. 24, 1706, at about 80 years" (Boston News Letter, 3:516) Warren, Daniel (I13043)
 
61 "Daniell Bate was born the 18th day of August 1697" Bates, Daniel (I22519)
 
62 "Daniell born the 20th February 1687" Bushnell, Daniel (I22392)
 
63 "dau. of William & Joan" Nunn, Isabel (Elizabeth) (I48849)
 
64 "Daughter of John & Dorcas" Riddlesdale, Sarah (I50190)
 
65 "Daughter of John Riddlesdale & Dorcas his wife." Riddlesdale, Susan (I49100)
 
66 "David Hill of Sherborn" Family F642
 
67 "David THOMSON" and "Amyes COLLE" were married in St. Andrews Church, Plymouth, England, 18 July 1613. He was an apothecary or merchant at Plymouth. Pope calls him "fishmonger" from London. He died about 1627 at Boston Harbor, leaving a son, John, who on 25 December 1643 assigned a bill to "my ffather mr. Samuell MAVERICK" and was living in 1650, and probably other children, since Mrs. Amias MAVERICK, in a letter from "Nottells Island in Massachusetts Bay", dated 20 November 1635 and addressed to Mr. Robert TRELAWNY, merchant, at Plymouth, England, speaks of her "ffatherless children".
It seems Sir Ferdinando GORGES and Captain MASON gave the original bond (Plymouth Company deed dated 10 Aug 1622) to settle Maine Province and made the deal with THOMPSON, "a cultured and travelled gentleman," whom they had previously employed in negotiations with high officials. According to Charles K. Bolton in "The Real Founders of New England," THOMPSON was "a shrewd man of business, familiar with all the enterprises for colonizing New England through his former position in England as agent for the Council." David THOMPSON about 1622/23 received the grant of some six thousand acres of Maine (now New Hampshire & Maine) on the condition of settling ten families within three years. He arrived in the spring of 1623 in the JONATHAN of Plymouth and built "a strong and large house" enclosed by a high palisade and protected by guns on the west side and near the mouth of the Piscataqua River at a place called "Little Harbor." This place is now Odiorne's Point in the town of Rye, NH.

There is evidence in the Public Record Office, in London, under the date of 1622, of a grant to Thompson which is earlier than his grant of land by the Piscataqua River in NH and of the Island in Boston Harbor. It states: "A Pattent to David Thompson, M. Jobe, M. Sherwood of Plimouth for a pt (point) of Piscattowa River in New England." The point of land specified in this grant was well up-river, where salmon could be caught in great numbers by stretching a seine across the river at a narrow point which is supposed to have been used by Thompson for that purpose, thus giving good reason for its name, Thompson's Point.

In the spring of 1624 he met with Capt. Robert GORGES, Capt. Francis WEST, Christopher LEVETT and two other men from New Plymouth to organize a government for New England and THOMPSON was one of the original councillors who had the power of government. To get the necessary capital, THOMPSON contracted with three Plymouth merchants to run the plantation five years, and then turn over to them three-fourths of the lands and profits. After three years' effort, he saw fit to remove to Thompsons Island in Massachusetts Bay, where he could have all his improved lands and all of his profits. Whether he had settled all the ten families within the three years, or whether GORGES and MASON had to come forward to finish the task, we do not know. There were apparently several people there in 1628 because Piscataqua contributed as much as Plymouth colony to the expense of banishing Morton, who was selling firearms to the Indians. During the year 1626, perhaps in the autumn, David THOMPSON took possession of the Island called "Trevour's" in Boston Harbor, afterward called by his name, and erected a habitation there. He died soon after. These facts shown to the General Court, they granted the island, which had been included in Dorchester, to his son John THOMPSON, 10 May 1648. !Pope, p.451

His settlement on Thompson's Island was the first to be established in what is now Boston Harbor. His house like most of the early settlers' houses was set by the four points of the compass, facing south. It appears to have been some thirty feet square with a high steep roof covered with thatch. Inside was a broad, deep fireplace which served for both cooking and warmth. The hearth was large and equipped with roomy ingles and seats by the fire.

The ruins of the old cellar wall and chimney of the original Thompson house were unearthed in 1889. They were remarkably well preserved. only the west corner, part of the west and north walls, the base of the chimney and part of the cellar floor were still intact. From these, the size, shape and position of the original structure were determined. The remains of the large open fireplace were found at the back of the ruins.

The cellar walls and chimney were built of field stone and the floor was paved with bricks measuring ten inches square, which must have been brought from England. Among the ruins, fragments of long stemmed Dutch pipes and other earthenware and artifacts were found. Erosion has now obliterated every trace of this ancient establishment. Even the land upon which this ancient structure stood has been washed away by the sea and rains.

Four depositions relating to THOMPSON'S Island are published in NEHGR 9:248 [1855]:

I Wm. TREVOUR &c that "Thompsons Island" is "the" formerly called "Island of Trevour" which I took possession of in 1619 and declared the same (as the effect of my proceedings) to Mr David THOMPSON in London; on which information the said T. obtained a grant and patten for peaceable and quiet possession of said island to him and heirs forever: I being in the Company's service at the said time. To this I testify on oath 27 of 2d mo 1650. Deposed the day before named before me Icr. Nowell. I Wm. Blaxton testify that the Island called Thompson's I. is by Dorchester neck, and that I heard ould Mr. Thompson affirm that he had a patten for it and that there is an harbour in that island for a boate which none of the rest of the islands had and that these that put hoggs there doe it by his consent to my knowledge. Taken upon oath this 5th of the 5th mo 1650. William Hibbins

I Saggamore of Aggawam testify that in the yeare 1619: or thereabouts as I Remember I went in my owne person with Mr David THOMPSON and then he took possession of the Island before Dorchester he likeing no other but that because of the Smale River and then no Indeans upon it or any wigwam or planting not hath been by any Endeans inhabbited or claimed since but two yeares agoe Harmlen an old Indian of Dorchester witnes my hand this 13th of July before Mr Greenleafe 1650. Edmund Greenleafe July 15th 1650

I doe testify that in the yeare 1620 I came into this Country and I take it the same yeare I was in the Massachusett Bay with William Trevoyre and then being upon the Island lying neere Dorchester And called the said Island; Island Trevoyre and then no natives there inhabiting neither was there any Signe of any that had been there that I could perceive nor of many many yeares after. Miles STANDISH Further I Cann testify that David THOMPSON shewed me a very Ancient Pattent and that Isle Thompson was in it but the termes of it I cannot remember. Miles STANDISH Deposed before the whole court 25th October 1650. Edmund RAWSON, Secretary

If "Caribdis underneath the mould" of *Thomas Morton's poem in the "New English Canaan" (page 277), written for the May pole revels in 1627, represents David THOMPSON, and "Scilla sollitary on the ground" in Amias, his widow, the THOMPSON was dead before May, 1627. The new husband lacking "vertue masculine" is of course Samuel MAVERICK, said to have been as strong as Sampson and as patient as Job. And she was, according to Morton, a difficult "Dallila"; but she was an heiress after THOMPSON's death, and suitors came by water from all about the Bay to pay their court to her.

Mrs. THOMPSON was the daughter of William COLE of Plymouth, England. Perhaps her second marriage which prevented her return to England caused her father to threaten to deprive her of her property. Her letter from Noddles Island, dated 20 Nov 1635, asks Robert Trelawny to help her. !The Real Founders of New England, by Charles Knowles Bolton, 1974

*Thomas Morton, d. c.1647, an English fur trader and adventurer, settled c.1624 at Merry Mount (now Quincy), Mass., and came into frequent conflict with his Pilgrim and Puritan neighbors. He was arrested three times on such charges as licentiousness and selling firearms to the Indians and was deported twice to England. He wrote a satiric tract against the New England Puritans, New English Canaan (1637; ed. by Charles Francis Adams, 1883; repr. 1966), and sought to have their charter revoked. Morton finally settled in Maine. 
Thomson, David (I15068)
 
68 "Deacon Francis Bushnell deceased this life December 4th, 1681." Bushnell, Francis Deacon (I22598)
 
69 "Debora Samford born the middle of Janry 1665" Sanford, Deborah (I22571)
 
70 "Deborah Stannard their daughter was born first day of November 1699" Stannard, Deborah (I22569)
 
71 "deceased 27: 4: 76" Farrington, John (I13459)
 
72 "deceased 3: 3: 76" Farrington, Judith (I14342)
 
73 "deceased" in daughter Ruth's marriage record. Wilkinson, Samuel (I26915)
 
74 "Dennel Cook." Cook, Daniel (I15692)
 
75 "deseased the 15 of Octobr 1677" Chapman, Sarah (I21970)
 
76 "Dorcas Chapman born the 26 of August 1680 deseased the begining of September following" Chapman, Dorcas (I21972)
 
77 "Eliz. Daniels, wid. of ____," Partridge, Elizabeth (I11752)
 
78 "Elizabeth Browne the wife of James Browne formerly Elizabeth Carr" was fined for fornication, 23 October 1672. Family F2879
 
79 "Elizabeth Chapman the wife of Capt John Chapman deceased the 30th of October 1694" Beaumont, Elizabeth (I23807)
 
80 "Elizabeth, wife of Banfield, ye aged, 10 May 1735" Blackington, Elizabeth (I26894)
 
81 "Ensign Joseph Peck" Peck, Joseph (I44227)
 
82 "Ephraim Bate was born the nine and twentieth of May 1692" Bates, Ephraim (I22518)
 
83 "Esekle Samford born in the year of our lord 1663" Sanford, Ezekiel (I22581)
 
84 "Francis Chapman born the 5th of August 1678" Chapman, Francis (I21971)
 
85 "From an early document: 25 October 1649. John Shepheard of Braintre [sic] in NE: carpender, husband of Margaret Squire, daughter of Henry Squire late of Kinweston[sic] neere Somerton in Somersetshire granted power of attorney to John Adams (Brother of Jonathan; born 1622, husband of Anne Howe) of Concord to receive all rents due for lands now or late in the tenure and occupation of Jonathan Adams living neere Ballsbury [sic] in Somersetshire."

Jonathan first appears in the town of Medfield in 1658. He had no grant of a house lot. He may have lived with a relative until he soon settled on the west side of the Charles River. Jonathan drew 84 acres in West Medway 1659, a few rods north of his brother Edward's.
His house was burned by the Indians in 1676, and his name appears among the petitioners for aid from the General Court on account of their losses. He evidently rebuilt on the same spot (in 1888, known as Joseph Adams place, in Millis); and he appears to have been in reduced circumstances for some years, as he had his own town rates remitted in 1684-85. His estate was inventoried 1691 when he had land and buildings west of Charles river.
!History of Medfield, Tilden:288 
Adams, Jonathan (I10894)
 
86 "From an early document: 25 October 1649. John Shepheard of Braintre [sic] in NE: carpender, husband of Margaret Squire, daughter of Henry Squire late of Kinweston[sic] neere Somerton in Somersetshire granted power of attorney to John Adams (Brother of Jonathan; born 1622, husband of Anne Howe) of Concord to receive all rents due for lands now or late in the tenure and occupation of Jonathan Adams living neere Ballsbury [sic] in Somersetshire."

Jonathan first appears in the town of Medfield in 1658. He had no grant of a house lot. He may have lived with a relative until he soon settled on the west side of the Charles River. Jonathan drew 84 acres in West Medway 1659, a few rods north of his brother Edward's.
His house was burned by the Indians in 1676, and his name appears among the petitioners for aid from the General Court on account of their losses. He evidently rebuilt on the same spot (in 1888, known as Joseph Adams place, in Millis); and he appears to have been in reduced circumstances for some years, as he had his own town rates remitted in 1684-85. His estate was inventoried 1691 when he had land and buildings west of Charles river.
!History of Medfield, Tilden:288 
Adams, Jonathan (I10894)
 
87 "gast entred" he died in his 81st year. Wight, Joseph (I14310)
 
88 "George Aldrich, one of the original proprietors of Mendon in 1663. Founder of the Aldrich Family in America died 1682, and buried here..."
Plaque placed at the entrance of the Aldrich Cemetery, Uxbridge (originally Mendon), MA 
Aldrich, George (I15067)
 
89 "George Allen of London, clothworker, and Katherine Starkes of Woking," Surrey, was noted by John K. Allen as in good chronological order for the NEw England couple. Since George Allen was from Somerset, and is not known to have been in London, this suggestion seems unlikely. Family F2897
 
90 "God brought me to America from Derbyshire, England, November 6, 1631." These are the words of George Aldrich, the progenitor of the American Aldrich race, and in which his unqualified faith In the over-ruling power of God In all things is clearly expressed.

The first learned of George Aldrich is of his marriage, September 3, 1629, to Katherine Seald, and about three years later he emigrated to America from Derbyshire, England, It is presumed that Derbyshire was where the marriage took place. The first found of him in America is in 1634, when a one-acre houselot was set off to him in Dorchester. Houselots In those days were generally larger than an acre, but as George Aldrich was a tailor by trade, the smallness of his houselot is explained. Whether he built a house on this one-acre lot we do not know; neither is it known how long was his stay in Dorchester, but it was for some little time at least, for we find that both he and his wife Katherine became member of the Dorchester church. George Aldrich was made freeman at Dorchester in 1636. In 1640 we find our ancestor in the town of Braintree as owner of about eight acres of land with buildings, and as he came from Braintree when coming to Mendon, and the births of the greater part of his children are recorded there, it is presumed that from 1640, or thereabouts, to 1663, Braintree was his home."

"George Aldrich was a tailor, and it is concluded that it was by this trade he gained subsistence, for with but one acre of land at Dorchester and only eight at Braintree, it would appear that he was paying but little attention to agriculture. It is also found that of sons, John and Peter, thus leaving him with but thirteen and one-third acres in his home lot. As he was about 60 years of age when coming to Mendon it is doubtful about his ever engaging much in farming here. The authorities who had the matter in charge, fixed for the rule of settling the new township of Mendon, that those who had been accepted as worthy to become members of the seemingly select company should reach the new territory before the seventh month, 1665, and, as stated above, Ferdinando Thayer and George Aldrich were among the first to comply with this requirement."

"At Mendon George Aldrich had a houselot set off to him a little southerly of the present Mendon village, which lot today comprises the southerly portion of the Gilbert Gaskill farm; and the house where George Aldrich lived, and some three or four generations after him, must have stood, in the vicinity of the Gilbert Gaskill vegetable garden, opposite the Gaskill house."

"Until 1786 the homestead of George Aldrich was in the hands of his descendants. At this time Rev. Caleb Alexander, the sixth settled minister of Mendon, bought the ancient Aldrich homestead, together with the John Harber houselot, (which sometime previous had come into possession of Stephen Aldrich, a great grandson of the first George) the above-mentioned Gaskill house being situated on the John Harber houselot."

"George Aldrich had eleven children, all of whom were born before his coming to Mendon, his youngest, son, Jacob, being seven years old at that time. George died In Mendon "March 1, 1682 and his wife Katherine Jan. 11, 1692. His first child., Abel, was probably born In England, and, as I find no trace of him or his birth date, it is concluded that he died there. Joseph, his second child, married Patience Osborne and came to Mendon with his father, he also becoming a proprietor. Joseph's houselot of 20 acres comprised the northerly portion of the N. R. George farm, extending across the road and taking in the southerly portion of the present home place of Julius A. George. The house of Joseph Aldrich stood in the vicinity of where our former village blacksmith, the late John Barry, lived and died. Joseph Aldrich stayed in Mendon until about the time of his father's death in 1682 when he removed to what is now Smithfield, Rhode Island, in which state many of his descendants are still found, including the Hon. Nelson W. Aldrich, the financial leader of the United States Senate, whose daughter married John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Joseph Aldrich was of the Quaker faith and tradition has It that on this account his house was spared at the burning of the town in 1676 by King Philip's warriors. The next three of George Aldrich's children all died young. John, the sixth child, married Sarah Thompson, daughter of John and Sarah Thompson of Mendon. He had a third part of his father's houselot and may properly be termed a proprietor. His lot of 15 1/3 acres comprised the southerly portion of the said N. R. George farm and his house is supposed to have been In the vicinity of where the Nathan George "yellow house" so called, formerly stood, In front of the town's burying ground. John Aldrich removed from Mendon to Bridgewater about the time of the King Philip war, where he is supposed to have lived until his death. "

"Peter, the eighth child, has not been positively traced but he is believed to have removed to Long Island and become the progenitor of the Aldrich branch who for many generations have existed there. Mercy, the ninth child, married John Randall, a son of Robert Randall of Weymouth, and as the births of some of their children are recorded in Mendon, it is evident that they lived here for a while at least. It is found, however, that they subsequently removed to Weymouth and spent their days on his father Robert's farm. Martha, the eleventh child of George Aldrich, married John Dunbar, and while they had a son born in Mendon, I have gained no further knowledge of them worthy of mention."

"I will now go back to the tenth child, Jacob, who married Ferdinando Thayer's daughter Huldah, and from here on the title of my paper, "The Thayer-Aldrich Tribe" applies. Jacob Aldrich and Huldah Thayer were married November 5, 1675 and in the main it will be upon their descendants that the remainder of this paper will treat. Jacob settled in Mendon on the Aldrich homestead which was bequeathed to him by his father, and while I do not wish to speak disparagingly of my own side of the house, I feel forced to admit that of the innumerable descendants of Jacob Aldrich and Huldah Thayer the Thayer blood has predominated. They had a family of twelve children, the most of whom grew to adult age. To six of their sons sixty-five children were born, and with eighteen children born to their daughters, eighty-three grand children are credited to Jacob Aldrich and Huldah Thayer."

Marcus M. Aldrich, Mendon, MA, 1908

The name of "George Aldrige" is included on a list of the first inhabitants of Swansea, 22 Feb 1668/9 [Bowen's "Early Rehoboth", vol. 1, p. 36]


From NEHGR vol. 139, pp. 21-49
The records of the Baptist Church in Swansea include:

9 Jun 1670
"Question agreed on from Feb. 8.; what is the tenour of the cov[enan]t f grace and how men come to be interested in it; to be this day 14night at bro Aldridges howse."

16 Feb 1670/1
". . . absent bro Miller, Aldridge."

11 Apr 1671
"Bro Aldrige and sister Aldrige and bro Alby have acknowledged themselves to be subject to the discipline of Christ in this church while continuing among us."

4 Jul 1672
"Ordered that bro Alby and bro Bosworth do require in the name of the church bro: Aldrige do appear before the church this day mo:"

Few records appear in the book after Jul 1672. The last record was on 22 Apr 1673. There were lists of names at the end with money amounts--unclear what they were: pledges, payments, debts? They names included:
George Aldrige -01-04
Katherine Aldrige -01-4d 
Aldrich, George (I15067)
 
91 "Goodman Bixby" Bixby, George (I48837)
 
92 "Hanna Samford born in the year of our lord 1656" Sanford, Hannah (I22579)
 
93 "Hannah Chalker the wife of Abraham Chalker dyed the 7th day of December 1683" Sanford, Hannah (I22579)
 
94 "Hannah Hill daughter to Trehan & Hannah Hill above said was born at Guilford the 16th day of November 1689" - SAYBROOK VR Hill, Hannah (I22375)
 
95 "Hannah Sannard their daughter was born 27 day of October 1695" Stannard, Hannah (I22563)
 
96 "Hannah townesend daughter of Martaine & Abigall towns-end deceassed the 3d of September" Townsend, Hannah (I25044)
 
97 "He was born June 14, 1659, in Dorchester, Mass." [RI Families] Salisbury, William (I44243)
 
98 "Hephzibah Bushnell born the 19th of August about an hour before sunset 1701. Ebenezer Bushnell born about four hours after they being
Twins" 
Bushnell, Ebenezer (I22395)
 
99 "Hephzibah Bushnell born the 19th of August about an hour before sunset 1701. Ebenezer Bushnell born about four hours after they being
Twins" 
Bushnell, Hepzibah (I22394)
 
100 "Here lies the body of Sarah Arnold aged 84; deceased April 15th 1713." Smith, Sarah (I27149)
 

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